Tips on Planning a Family Activity Break

Unsure how to go about planning a family activity break and guarantee it doesn’t turn into a disaster waiting to happen? The key is to plan ahead. To ensure your holiday doesn’t descend into chaos, discuss all the different options as a family, so everyone, children included feel like they have a say in the planning of the family holiday.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/adventuresinlibrarianship

If the thought of organising your next big family holiday makes you want to curl up on the couch, don’t worry, help is on hand. Holidays with the kids can be fun, adventurous, luxurious and most importantly relaxing and stress-free. Here are some relatively simple and easy tips to avoid a family holiday disaster…

First lets start with transport, if you are flying, it’s important to know before you depart, the total number of pieces of luggage you will be taking with you on holiday. That includes check-in luggage, carry-on, and speciality items such as skis, car-seats, strollers etc. Checking in can often be chaotic and a bad start to a holiday, a stress-free check-in means you start your holiday on the best footing.

To avoid all of the uncertainty of travel and check-in worries why not holiday closer to home. Take short trips within your own country and  take advantage of historical sites, national parks and other attractions closer to your home.

If you are travelling with young pre-teen children and find they are getting restless, consider stopping early and saving the activity for another time. Sometimes just getting back to your accommodation is all they want to do.

While in the planning stage of your holiday, each family member has to be honest about what they want from the holiday and be open to ideas from other family members. Remember it’s a family break, not an individual one. All opinions must be taken into account.

Also at the planning is the budget, think of what you’ll need to pay for, accommodation  flights, car-hire, insurance, entertainment, food and drink, and set a limit. Overestimating a budget rather than underestimating is encouraged, as there always little extra costs that come up.

 

5 Tips for Traveling with a Partner

Traveling with a partner 1Solo long-term travel can be a very lonely business. While some people may find this to be a preferable, it is generally more common on the backpacker trail to see groups of friends and couples. Traveling with someone with whom you are in a relationship can be an endlessly rewarding experience, but it also carries with it some potential pitfalls. Here are five tips for making the most out of your trip and your relationship:

1. Get some time apart
Living together, eating together, seeing sites together, taking the bus together…you may easily find yourself doing absolutely nothing without your partner. For a short trip, there’s generally nothing wrong with this. But after a certain point, you need to allow at least a little bit of distance. Constant contact with a person drives both people crazy, especially in situations that are at times stressful (like navigating the logistical, financial, and emotional pitfalls of extended time on the road). It’s also good to establish your own impressions and relationships with a place. In other words, every memory that you have of this trip afterwards should not be dominated by your partner’s presence in it.

2. Make collective decisions
Many partnerships are dominated on some level by a personality that is more assertive. While this person may not rule every aspect of the relationship, the extensive planning and logistical work inherent in long-term travel may all fall to them even if neither of you realize it. Make sure that you are making decisions together, so that both of you get to do what you want and no one feels overworked or under-appreciated.

Traveling with a partner 23. Meet other people
It’s easy to get wrapped up in your comfort zone. This prevents many couples from expanding their social experience by meeting other travelers or locals. If you are traveling with a partner, it is important to make an extra effort to be social with other people. If a group of people is going from your hostel to get dinner, join them. If there are other foreigners on the local bus, talk with them. It’s especially easy to link up with other couples and find good travel partnerships in that way.

4. Keep a blog or email list
Between the two of you, there are likely a million people back home that are interested in what you’re up to. Coordinate together to send an email update to everyone at once, or better yet, keep a travel blog. Review the best hosting accounts available so you can host your own blog to track your journey. This will allow you to keep everyone at home abreast, but also act as a journal and place that you can put photos to words for your own future memory-keeping. It’s much easier to keep up a travel blog if you alternate posts rather than one person writing everything.

Traveling with a partner 35. Communicate your feelings
This is relationship advice that applies under any circumstances, but it can be especially important when traveling because of the extra stress, proximity at all times, and distractions. Make sure that you are on the same page, and if you aren’t, make sure your partner knows. Be honest, even if it leads to conflict, and then focus on solving any disturbances.

Traveling with a romantic partner can be an immensely strengthening experience, but it has risks. Follow these tips, and hopefully you can avoid any potential pitfalls along your path.

5 Common Health Problems for Backpackers

If you’re on the road for any amount of time, you’re likely to run into a myriad of minor health issues. None of these are generally worth ending your trip for, but it does pay to know what your poor body and mind are likely to undergo as you traipse around the globe. Here are five of the most common:

 

5 common health problems 11. Traveler’s Diarrhea

Nothing is guaranteed in this life but death and the inevitability of contracting Delhi Belly/Mummy’s Tummy/Montezuma’s Revenge. Yup, you’re going to get the runs. You can put it off by drinking bottled water and avoiding ice and uncooked fruits and veggies, but sooner or later your luck will run out. Fortunately, this affliction generally hurts nothing but your pride (so long as you lay off the spicy food), and passes within a few days. Stay hydrated, eat plain rice and toast, take OTC medications, and antibiotics only if it becomes too severe. If you venture out of your room, bring lots of TP—the next bathroom you rush into may not be equipped.

 

2. Dehydration

It’s hot, you’re carrying 20 kilos of stuff you were sure you would need when you were packing two months ago, and this damn restaurant charges too much for bottled water. Without your mom reminding you to drink lots of water, you’ve forgotten to do so, and now you’re in for it. Extreme dehydration can be quite dangerous and result in an unpleasant trip to the local clinic for IV fluids and possibly overnight monitoring. Drink your fluids. Booze doesn’t count.

5 common health problems 23. Motorbike accidents

Sure, renting a scooter for a few dollars and riding around with your lady on the back can be the best part of a trip to a rural area in a foreign country. It seems easy enough, and there isn’t much traffic to worry about, until you hit that speedbump. There’s always a speedbump that has no purpose other than to maim foreigners. Wear a helmet, drive slowly, don’t listen to music, and be as vigilant as humanly possible. It sucks to carry your pack while wearing a cast.

 

4. Stress and headaches

Adapting to the insanity of life in developing countries can be overwhelming. Noise, heat, pollution, and annoyance with these %$&#&@%$ tuk tuk drivers can get to your head easily and cause psychological and physical pain. Add to that the strain of being constantly on the move, and you have a recipe for a pretty bad day. Take time to relax, get a massage, and check into a hotel that costs more than $5 once in a while just to keep hold of your sanity.

 

5 common health problems 3

5. Alcohol and drug overdose

Sure, you’re not that kind of person, but we know about that happy shake you had on Koh Phanang, and that wild night in Goa. Add cheap liquor and good times to the mix, and there’s potential for some serious damage. Moderate your intake of any mind-altering substances that you choose to imbibe, be as sure as possible that what you’re taking is safe, and stick with your friends. Don’t mix substances, and have relevant emergency contact numbers readily available. Every year, young people die very tragically while having the time of their lives. Don’t be one of them.

 

With a few basic precautions, you can avoid having your trip affected or even ruined by these common problems. Take care of yourself, and keep adventuring.