• 3 Interesting facts about Mt. Kilimanjaro

    Soon I will be heading off on my long awaited trip to Mt Kilimanjaro. I can’t wait to get there, the excitement has been giving me sleepless nights! I’ll soon be boarding my trip to Tanzania for what I think will be the trip of a lifetime. Of course I’ve been doing non stop research, I have found out so many interesting facts over the past few weeks I wanted to share them with you. If you’re interested in Tanzania or Mt Kilimanjaro then you will find them very useful indeed.

    It is the tallest free-standing mountain on the planet

    Mt Kilimanjaro measures 19,341 feet, in meters that’s a whopping 5,898! It is obviously the tallest mountain in the whole of Africa and it can also take the title for being the highest free standing mountain on the planet. To get an idea of just how big it is – in Japan, Mt Fuji is 12,388 feet (3,776 meters), if we were to put these two free standing mountains side by side you would see Mt Kilimanjaro towering of Fuji.

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    Thousands try to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro each and every year

    All climbers say that reaching the peak is absolutely amazing but the most exhilarating part is the climb, this is why more than 20,000 people head to the slopes ever year. Now here are the crazy facts about the 20,000 that attempt the climb each year; around two thirds will make it to the peak, 1,000 have to be evacuated from the mountain and unfortunately 10 perish. One of the main issues is that people fall foul to altitude sickness, at the peak of Kilimanjaro you will have around 50% less oxygen in each breath as you do at sea level.

    Who was the first man to climb Mt Kilimanjaro?

    As I have said just now, thousands of people climb Kilimanjaro each year but who was the first person to have made it to the top? A german man called Hans Meyer was the first to reach the peak way back in 1889 – it’s crazy to think how tough that must have been back then! I know that the air is thin up there but there must be something good about it because after giving tours of the mountain for seventy years, Mr Meyer lived to 124!

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  • Essential India Travel Tips for First Timers

    If you’ve never been to India before, I’m sure you’ll have a great time on your first trip there. However, there are a few things you should be aware of to make sure that this will be the trip of a lifetime. These essential travel tips should help you:

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    Staying Comfortable

    If you want to stay comfortable, you’ll need some good walking shoes and sandals. I also recommend something to swim in, but a one piece is more appropriate than a two piece. If you want to travel light, leave most of your clothes at home and simply buy your clothes over here. The tunics and trousers will suit the weather, cover you up nicely, and will stop people trying to sell to you or beg from you. The least you’ll need is a long scarf to make sure you can enter holy buildings.


    Practice and Study Yoga

    If you’d like to practice and study yoga where it originated, then head over to Rishikesh. It’s great for women travelling alone here. You’ll meet other women and get some exercise too! Just make sure you keep your wits about you if you’re a lone woman.


    Staying Safe

    It’s important you stay safe, especially if you’re a woman travelling alone. Even if you’re not, the same rules apply! The following pointers should stop you from getting unwanted attention:

    • Don’t wear skimpy clothing. Shorts, skirts, and strappy tops should be avoided. A traditional Indian suit is recommended.
    • Don’t be too friendly with men who approach you, even if they are hotel staff. Speak to the women instead. You will rarely see an Indian woman speak to a man unless she’s with her husband.
    • If you find a male is staring at you, look down and away. This will let him know you are not interested. Anything else could be taken the wrong way.
    • Never accept an alcoholic drink from a stranger.
    • Don’t walk in quiet areas by yourself.


    Avoiding Fatigue

    Try not to do too much at once, as visitors all agree you can get fatigued quickly. The place isn’t going anywhere, so take your time when exploring.


    Carefully Choose Your Route

    By thinking about what you’d like to get out of your trip, you can plan your route accordingly. The most popular route is where you start in Delhi, then Agra, then finally Jaipur. Each place is great for different things. For example, Delhi is great for shopping. Taking an Indian Tiger Safari is recommended, whichever route you choose.



    You don’t want to end up with an illness because you ate suspicious food. Lots of people take on the vegetarian way of life in India, as there are a lot of dishes to choose from. Many Indians are vegetarian too. Try it!

    If you’re spending part of your gap year in India, you can get more great ideas here. I hope you found these travel tips useful, and they prepared you for your trip. Have fun! See you next time.


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  • Awesome Ideas for How to Spend Your Gap Year

    There’s no doubting that the university years are often some of the busiest and most challenging of your life. There’s the pressure of exams, and you may also be learning to live independently for the first time. There’s also social pressure to consider. The fresher years are notorious for being full of parties and alcoholic excess. So, it’s of little wonder that many people decide to take a gap year, before continuing their education. For the majority of people, this is a wise decision. Number one, because it allows people to rest and refresh themselves after what could be more than a year of study. Number two, it gives young adults an opportunity to explore the world, meet different people, and have new and exciting experiences.

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    Explore your Options

    The question is, with a whole world to explore, and so many options available to us, how exactly do we go about choosing how to spend our gap year? Well, this post is here to help you answer that very question! Firstly, it’s useful to have a quick brainstorming session to help you narrow down what you hope to get out of your year off. Ask yourself, what are my priorities? Do you want to experience different cultures and learn about indigenous customs and traditions of native people? Perhaps you’d like to taste fine cuisines and exotic delicacies from around the globe? However, many people find that the most rewarding ways of spending your gap year is to volunteer in a country in desperate need of help.


    A Place in Need…

    The idea of setting off to a foreign country as a volunteer or charity worker can be pretty daunting. Such countries may have been ravaged by war and political conflict. Others may also be affected by famine and disease. This can be extremely upsetting for a person of any age, let alone a young adult. So, it can be a bit of a shock to the system on first arrival.


    However, this is exactly why you’re out there in the first place. Once you adjust to the situation and start to get to work, you’ll see just how much of a difference you can make. You could help to build houses for communities in need, or teach English to the children of an isolated village in a third-world country. Perhaps you have an interest in environmental preservation? If so, organisations such as ‘The Leap’ offer gap-year travel options that cover all of these areas.




    Remember, there are no right or wrong ways to spend your gap year. If you want to spend it in your pyjamas watching old reruns of ‘Big Bang Theory’, then that’s perfectly okay. But if you do decide to venture out into the big old world, you may just find that it’s the best decision you ever made. Because ultimately how you decide to spend your gap year will help to determine what kind of adult you become. So if you want to be courageous, adventurous and live your life to the full, then you know what you have to do. If not, then the remote control’s right where you left it.

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