The Wander Kind » March 19, 2013

Daily Archives: March 19, 2013

Five ways to live like the French

What is the French way of life? Do you imagine cycling through Province, sun beating on your back, wearing a beret and an amulet of garlic around your neck? If you do you may be in for a surprise, as statistics show three quarters of the French population live in the towns and cities. So much for stereotypes, but one stereotype about typical French way of life does ring true, the food and more specially the art of eating.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ant1_g

Eating out in France is not, generally, expensive. A two-course lunch can usually be found for around €12, but if you’re travelling on a tight budget, that may still be too much. Which is where a supermarket comes in handy, eat well and healthy for less.

But eating out in a French restaurant is a joy you have to savour once while on your holiday if you wish to really learn the French way of life. The French love taking their time over food, fast food is not an option for authentic French living. Good food and even better wine is an integral part of France.

Eating at home or at your rented accommodation is an excellent way to experience the French way of life. Tracking down a local farmer’s market or even a local food stuff shop and you’ll be amazed at the array of cheeses, cured meats and beards available.

But what is traditional French cuisine? The French place a high priority on the enjoyment of food. Dishes and ingredients vary by region but there are some significant regional dishes which have become national dishes of France. Cheese and wine play a major role in French cuisine, while there still differences regionally, it is safe to say no French meal is complete with a cheese board or glass of wine.

 

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Tips on Planning a Family Activity Break

Unsure how to go about planning a family activity break and guarantee it doesn’t turn into a disaster waiting to happen? The key is to plan ahead. To ensure your holiday doesn’t descend into chaos, discuss all the different options as a family, so everyone, children included feel like they have a say in the planning of the family holiday.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/adventuresinlibrarianship

If the thought of organising your next big family holiday makes you want to curl up on the couch, don’t worry, help is on hand. Holidays with the kids can be fun, adventurous, luxurious and most importantly relaxing and stress-free. Here are some relatively simple and easy tips to avoid a family holiday disaster…

First lets start with transport, if you are flying, it’s important to know before you depart, the total number of pieces of luggage you will be taking with you on holiday. That includes check-in luggage, carry-on, and speciality items such as skis, car-seats, strollers etc. Checking in can often be chaotic and a bad start to a holiday, a stress-free check-in means you start your holiday on the best footing.

To avoid all of the uncertainty of travel and check-in worries why not holiday closer to home. Take short trips within your own country and  take advantage of historical sites, national parks and other attractions closer to your home.

If you are travelling with young pre-teen children and find they are getting restless, consider stopping early and saving the activity for another time. Sometimes just getting back to your accommodation is all they want to do.

While in the planning stage of your holiday, each family member has to be honest about what they want from the holiday and be open to ideas from other family members. Remember it’s a family break, not an individual one. All opinions must be taken into account.

Also at the planning is the budget, think of what you’ll need to pay for, accommodation  flights, car-hire, insurance, entertainment, food and drink, and set a limit. Overestimating a budget rather than underestimating is encouraged, as there always little extra costs that come up.

 

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